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How to better plan for 2019 in two hours

How can you better plan for 2019 in just two hours?

The end of the year is quickly approaching. Have you started planning for 2019? Every business owner knows that planning for a yearly budget is much easier when you know what IT projects are upcoming, or what equipment needs to be replaced. A good place to start is with a free network assessment.

Utilizing this complimentary service can give you a look into where vulnerabilities and problems may exist on your network and its equipment. Regularly reviewing your network is vital in ensuring it is running at peak performance and is protected from data loss, downtime, viruses and breaches.

If your system is not regularly monitored, assessing your infrastructure is critical. Businesses often fall behind in upgrades and compliance simply because they are busy running their business. Having a third party evaluate your network can give you a peace of mind and can catch issues you may not know exist.

The process is conducted on site at your office and generally takes anywhere from one to two hours to complete. Based on our findings we will compile a list of suggestions and concerns and present them to you at a later date. There is absolutely no obligation to move forward with our recommendations, or to purchase any services or equipment from us.

The benefits of a network assessment can give you an excellent snapshot of where your business is technologically and can help you to develop an action plan to keep your systems up to date and running optimally.

Request your free network assessment today. There is no hassle, or obligation.

If you would like more information, contact us here or call 937.885.7272.

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Posted by Jack Gerbs in Recent Posts

Cyber Statistics Snapshot for August 2018

If you have been to any of our presentations you have heard Jack mention statistics from the website Hackmageddon.com, each month they issue a report of statistics in cyber crime incidents for the previous month. In an effort to create easier to digest bits of information the highlights of those reports will be illustrated monthly on our blog in the form of an infographic.

Below is the information compiled for August 2018. As in most months the leading motivation for the attacks are cyber crime at 77%, followed by cyber espionage, cyber warfare and hacktivism.

35% of those attacks are carried out via malware – think viruses, spyware, etc. and 23% of those attacks are going after the individual.

How do you go about NOT becoming a statistic?

  1. Educate yourself and your team. Learn about the tools and techniques criminals use to manipulate their victims.
  2. Use strong passwords. Knowing how to create strong passwords and using them is one of the easiest and most basic first steps to becoming more secure.
  3. Ask questions. Does something seem suspicious? Know the signs to look for and what to do if you suspect you may be compromised.

If you would like more information, contact us here or call 937.885.7272.

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Cyber attack infographic

Cyber attack infographic

Posted by Jack Gerbs in Recent Posts

3 Posts to help up your password game

Having a strong password is one of the easiest ways to keep your information out of the hands of the bad guys but what does a strong password consist of? What steps should you take in safeguarding your passwords?

We have written several posts on the subject previously but have combined them all in one place for easy reference.

Can you remember all of your passwords?
This post discusses the recent changes and recommendations regarding easier to remember passwords.

Password Reuse
In this article the dangers of reusing a single password are covered, as well as reliable password managers.

Don’t use personal passwords at work
It’s important to make sure your employees understand why they should use different passwords at home versus at work.

If you would like more information contact us here or call 937.885.7272.

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Posted by Jack Gerbs in Recent Posts

Cybersecurity News – CEO Fraud and BEC

Cybersecurity newsWhat is CEO Fraud/ BEC?

Our most recent white paper discusses email takeover, but it is becoming such a common email attack we felt it necessary to go touch on the subject again.

An evolving email attack called CEO Fraud or Business Email Compromise (BEC) is a growing problem. Cyber attackers take the time to research their targets and use tactics to trick their victim into doing something they shouldn’t.

How is it successful?

Because this tactic does not utilize attachments or malicious links, typical security technologies cannot catch them, which is why informing yourself and the people within your organization is that much more important.

For an attacker to be successful he must first research his intended victim and the people they interact with. For example, the people within your office or organization. They then create an email disguised as one of these people and convince you that it is urgent you take the action stated in the email.

Common Scams

Wire transfer is a common way cyber attackers get a victim to send them money. In the email, they pressure their victim into transferring money by telling them there is an emergency and they must send it right away to a new account, when actually they are sending money to the criminal.

Another common scam attempts to access the tax information of the employees of a company. This email tactic is usually sent to someone within Human Resources and appears to be from a senior executive who urgently needs the tax information of all the employees. HR believes they are sending the requested information to the executive when they are really sending it to a cyber criminal.

Related: Read more stories in our white paper

How do you protect yourself?

Learn what to look for. Here are some of the most common clues:

– the message is short
– the signature includes it was sent from a mobile device
– there is a strong sense of urgency, usually pressuring you to ignore company policies
– the email appears to be from a personal email address, not a work-related one
– the tone of the email is out of character for the person whom it is said to be from
– in respect to payments, the instructions differ from normal procedure

If you are suspicious of an email, do not reply to the sender but report it to your supervisor immediately. If a transfer has already been made alert the bank, then law enforcement.

Related: How to identify a phishing email

If you would like more information, contact us here or call 937.885.7272.

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Posted by Jack Gerbs in Recent Posts